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Books By Tirunelveli Medical College Alumni
FirsTest Series - Biochemistry - Jeyarani, Amali Bruno & Brindha Vignesh- Kalam Books
firsTest (First Test) Series Books Kalambooks, written by experienced authors, with original questions asked in previous years, well researched answers, referenced from Standard text books, with explanation, diagrams, tables Mnemonics and Tips for Solving
500 Indian Exam Questions with Answers and Explanations
FirsTest Series - Ortho - Bruno - Kalam Books
firsTest (First Test) Series Books Kalambooks, written by experienced authors, with original questions asked in previous years, well researched answers, referenced from Standard text books, with explanation, diagrams, tables Mnemonics and Tips for Solving
500 Indian Exam Questions with Answers and Explanations
Zulfi Raj's Pre PG Medicine Handbook - Bruno - Jaypee Brothers
Zulfi Raj's Pre PG Medicine Handbook - Bruno - Jaypee Brothers
3rd Edition
Crash Course for AIIMS Nov 2012, PGI Dec 2012, AIPG Jan 2013, TNPG Feb 2013 from Sep 28,2012 to Oct 09,2012 at Chennai
Sunday, November 21, 2010
For a doctor, everything is in a name - Dr.Ramanugam (1993 -1999 Batch) Article in Hindu
From http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/open-page/article902026.ece


If you forget the patient's name, it is often taken as lack of concern for him.
Doctors are often expected to have a good memory. They memorise umpteen Greek and Latin terms like ‘pneumohydropericardium.' A doctor has to remember the names of at least 100 scientists given to the syndromes they discovered. They may range from names as easy as Down's tongue-twisters like the Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome.
Many scientists worked throughout their lifetime to describe syndromes which were named after them. With due respect to them, let us just see the lighter side of it.
Names haunt a medical student throughout. No day will dusk without a question about a named syndrome. Sometimes, your knowledge is measured in direct proportion to the number of names you know. Sometimes, the same person might have invented more than one disease. So the answer depends on whether you are appearing for the obstetrics or orthopaedics exam. It goes to the extent that a student wishes that he were born two or three centuries before so that only a few names needed to be remembered just like a history student's wish to have been born a millennium earlier!
To rub salt into the wound, almost all names are completely alien to our tongues, which are familiar to Ramaswamys and Subramaniams. There exist unique ways of pronouncing those names. (We even pronounce Shakespeare as ‘Jagapriyar' in an Indological way). I have heard 11 varieties of pronouncing the ‘Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser' syndrome. The student patriotically wishes that the Indians discover more syndromes to take revenge on foreigners.
Now coming to dysnomia, it is a difficulty in recollecting names (especially of persons and objects) or frankly forgetting names. Doctor's dysnomia does not stop with the student days.
When he starts practice, a doctor has to remember the names of his patients. You can make a grave mistake in diagnosing a patient's disease or probing his heart on the right side with a stethoscope. But if you forget the patient's name it is often taken as lack of concern for him.
During the golden period of family physicians, doctors remembered not only patients' names but also their complete psycho-social milieu. Patients felt completely reassured when they were greeted with something like, “Hello, Raju! How is your fever”?
But now not everybody expects his name to be remembered! Thanks to the era of specialists, patients are often seen as files with reports and prescriptions. There is an old aphorism: ‘Don't treat the lab report! Treat the patient!' I feel guilty whenever I am not able to remember a patient's name. But I have few tricks to cover myself up. If he has brought old prescriptions or reports, then the problem is over. But if he is unarmed, then I become clueless. I usually guess a few names which are invariably misnomers. When I stumble at Mr. or Mrs., many of them volunteer with their names, of course, some with a small tangible disappointment.
It is with tele-conversation that I stumble the most. People may just say their name and take my memory for granted. (There is a famous Tamil poem by Nakulan about a name that goes like neither I asked which Ramachandran he is nor did he say it). When the matter becomes so serious that it may jeopardise his health I usually admit that I do not recognise him.
But there are many whom I remember clearly and, invariably, they are the ones who introduce themselves every time in detail. Probably one more vignette to Murphy's laws! Sometimes they did not want me, a psychiatrist, to remember their names so as to avoid my calling them in a crowded mall. Juliet might have said “What is in a name?” But, to some at least, it matters. So I have resolved to do two things. Try still harder to remember names; and not to name any syndrome discovered by me Ramanujam's syndrome.
(The writer is a consultant psychiatrist. His email is: ramsych@sify.com)

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posted by புருனோ Bruno @ 7:51 AM   2 comments

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  • At 11/25/2010 6:39 AM, Blogger sheik sulaiman said…

    Interesting article!
    Nowadays, its little bit easy as I ask the nurse to bring the file into the consultation room before the patient comes in. In case of rounds,if I don't remember the patient's name,I always ask the nurse whose is standing by the side (she is the scape goat,if she doesn't remember either)
    Another interesting and important issue is, referring the pharmaceutical books for accurate dose and side effects of the medications. In India, if a doctor refers a book in front of a patient, imagine what would happen! But, in Western countries, if a doctor refers a book infront of a patient, he or she will take that as an extra care thinking that the doctor is very careful to avoid unnecessary problems. See the difference in the attitude of people!

     
  • At 11/25/2010 8:08 AM, Blogger புருனோ Bruno said…

    //. In India, if a doctor refers a book in front of a patient, imagine what would happen! //

    :) :)

     
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Quit smoking, for heaven's sake - Dr.Dorai 1992 to 1998 Batch Article in Hindu
From http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/open-page/article902024.ece

A 60-year-old man gets admitted to the intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital with complaints of fever and breathlessness for two days. He is diagnosed as a case of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) with respiratory failure, just hours before he knocks at the doors of death. Though he had troublesome respiratory symptoms for many years, and has been moving around consulting more than half-a-dozen doctors, none has made a precise diagnosis of COPD. Had the diagnosis been made earlier, it would have been possible to prolong his life, if not saving him permanently from the icy hands of death.

This is just one example. The bitter truth is that a large number of COPD cases (of course, a few other respiratory diseases too) go undiagnosed, misdiagnosed or under-diagnosed and get undertreated/mistreated in our country or rather throughout the globe, leading to permanent complications and poor quality of life thereafter. A simple test called spirometry would make a precise diagnosis of COPD.

According to the World Health Organisation's global estimates, 210 million people have COPD. The rate of morbidity and mortality from COPD will increase over the next 20 years and make COPD the third leading cause of death (currently the fourth) and the fifth leading cause of disability.

I do not underestimate the potential of the Indian medical fraternity, but the slackness with which it deals with respiratory care needs to be modified. This slackness has been utilised, rather misused, by the self-advertising and recently the legally insulated quacks (in the medical field) and the crude and brutal treatment administered by them has added to the burden of respiratory handicaps.

So what is this COPD? A condition where your airway loses its elasticity and becomes rigid, i.e., your airways which are like rubber tubes turn into plastic tubes.

As a result, there is airflow limitation in and out of the lungs, thereby compromising oxygen supply to the whole body. As a result, the person becomes breathless, coughs up, expectorates troubling himself and his loved ones for years before he dies a painful death.

Tobacco smoking is the main culprit behind the cruel damage. However, smoke from other sources has also been implicated but to a lesser extent. An exponential increase in cigarette smoking in the Indian subcontinent has alarmingly increased the prevalence of COPD.

With global warming, the risk of premature death among chronic respiratory patients is up to six times higher than in the rest of the population.

Hence, much has to be done to chase out this social evil. A mere pictorial warning on tobacco products will not help. Healthier lifestyles should be inculcated and reinforced as the kid grows.

Beware: if you kiss a cigarette, it reciprocates by biting your lungs. So those who smoke quit it today, and those who do not never ever think of starting it. Remember, “Lighting up a cigarette would darken your life permanently.” The theme for world COPD day ‘2010-The Year of the Lung: Measure your lung health-Ask your doctor about a simple breathing test called spirometry.'

(The writer is post-graduate student in Thoracic Medicine, Thanjavur Medical College, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. His email id is: drpdorai@yahoo.com)

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Tuesday, November 02, 2010
Message from Dr.Kannan Bhaba 1993 to 99 Batch
HI TVMCIANS. I AM Dr.V.KANNAN BHABA. 93-99 BATCH. PRESENTLY POST GRADUATE IN NEPHROLOGY KILPAUK MEDICAL COLLEGE. MY CONTACT NO 94431 58422

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Books By Tirunelveli Medical College Alumni
Diabetes Mellitus - Jaypee Brothers
Diabetes Mellitus by Dr.S.Shanmugam
Dr.S.Shanmugam
Scott's Pedia-TRICKS
Scott's Pedia-TRICKS
First edition, 2006, 650 pages Rs.450 MRP
FirsTest Series - Paediatrics - Raja.S.Vignesh - Kalam Books
firsTest (First Test) Series Books Kalambooks, written by experienced authors, with original questions asked in previous years, well researched answers, referenced from Standard text books, with explanation, diagrams, tables Mnemonics and Tips for Solving
500 Indian Exam Questions with Answers and Explanations
Books for TNPSC
TargetPG TNPSC 1995 to 2007 - Dr.Bruno - Kalam Books
Target PG Series TNPSC 2nd Edition by Dr.Bruno
Second Edition - 16 Original Papers from 1995 to 2007 - 2720 Original Questions with Explanations
TargetPG TNPSC Interview Buster Assistant Surgeon Recruitment Exam by Dr.Bruno
TargetPG TNPSC Interview Buster Assistant Surgeon Recruitment
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